What if you had to give two weeks' warning to the police and your employer every time you wanted to post something important on Twitter or Facebook?

The Trade Union bill currently before Parliament suggested unions do just that when they take action. Ridiculous? Yes. But also very scary, as unions could have been the first in line for this attack on civil liberties.

In September and October 2015, many thousands helped to highlight the absurdity of this bill and the two week notice period on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtag #TwoWeekWarning.

As a result of the campaigning, on 3 November 2015 the Government confirmed it is dropping this particularly pernicious aspect of the regulation (confirming the FT story of early October).

 

The Financial Times announces the likely dropping of social media regulations on trade unions as part of the Trade Union Bill, 12 October 2015.

The Financial Times announces the likely dropping of social media regulations on trade unions as part of the Trade Union Bill, 12 October 2015.

However the Trade Union Bill itself is still being heavily pushed by the Government. This Bill is an attack on the human rights of UK working people and should be stopped. Find out more at the TUC site about how you can play your part.

 
 

How did #TwoWeekWarning work?

Thousands signed up to join hundreds sending out a message through Facebook, Twitter or Tumblr during the Conservative Party Conference at the beginning of October. The message sent was:

They were also given a chance to share a message immediately to your followers after they'd signed up, this was their TwoWeekWarning:

 

Do #TwoWeekWarning your own way

If you agree that giving two weeks notice on social media posts is ridiculous and have another way you'd like to use the #TwoWeekWarning hashtag then do – we promise to share and retweet any we see from the @TwoWeekWarning account.